The Grandfather

Level: Any Level

Objective : to practice the numbers.

Procedure :

Students are sit in circle. Then, they are given a number. One of them or the teacher can be the Grandfather. The game goes like this.

A : When the grandpa died, he left twenty cups of wine.

( the person who has number 20 answers :) 
B : why 20 ? 
A : So, how many ? 
B : what about 2 ?

( the person with number 2 says : )

C : why 2 ? 
B : So, how many ? 
C : what about 3 ?

(and so on..) 
The winner is the person who does not hesitate and make a mistake. Advanced students must play the game in English. But if you have beginners, the game can be played in the students« mother tongue ; however, numbers must be said in English. Students need to be attentive, otherwise they are asked to leave the game. 
Submitted by Hermilo Gomez Hernandez - Universidad de Quintana Roo, Mexico

Who Am I?

Level: Any Level

You can use use this with any subject. Write the names of famous people (mixed nationalities) on small pieces of paper. Tape a name on the forehead of each student. The individual student should not see his or her paper, but the others should. Then, like with 20 questions, only yes or no questions should be asked. Perhaps start with yourself and ask "Am I am man?" If the answer is yes, I can ask again, but if the answer is no, it's the next person's turn. Play until everyone has guessed who he or she is! This can be played with nationalities, countries, household objects, anything and it's a gas, especially for adult students!! 

Animals, Our Friends

Level: Medium to Difficult

In February of 1998, a Somerset (UK) man was trapped under a fallen van he 
had been repairing. As he cried for help and darkness fell it seemed he 
would be left there all night; his leg had been caught beneath the wheels. 
The area was rather isolated and nobody heard his cries-except a parrot 
perched on a caravan in a nearby camp site. The bird mimicked the man's 
cries, which is apparently normal behaviour for this type of animal, and 
alerted two men working in the area. These reversed the van off the injured 
man, who, in the end, only had slight injuries.

Activity A

Have you ever been in a similar situation? Has an animal ever helped you in 
some way?

Activity B

Do you think animals are necessary for humans? Why?

Examples:

Company 
Protection 
Cosmetic testing 
........... 
...........

Activity C

List the most helpful animals, and why.

Examples:

1 The elephant can transport us and pull trees 
2 Dogs keep us company 
3 Spiders eat flies 
4 Cows give us meat and leather 
5 ..................... 
6 .......................... 

Activity D

Negative points associated with animals

1 They bite humans 
2 They answer the call of nature anywhere 
3 They bark and wake us up at night 
4 ............. 
5 ................. 

Activity E

Should we use animals to test drugs and cosmetic products on? If your 
answer is "no", what way do you suggest instead? Humans? Robots?

Activity F

 

 

 

When you are at home, studying or watching TV, and you see a fly or a 

spider, what is your first reaction? Do you normally kill it? Why? 
Submitted by Gerard Counihan

Truth or Lie?

Level: Any Level

This isn't really new. I got the idea from a book and have expanded on it a bit. It can be used at any level from pre-int. up. It can be used just for speaking practice but it's particularly useful if you're doing present perfect for past experiences. It works soooo well! The students just love it! Lots of question and past tense practice. Even the quiet ones will talk! 
Based on a group of three (it can be done in pairs, or fours if you write some more questions), each student has a piece of paper with five questions on it (see below) and takes it in turns to ask the person on their left one of their questions. The student answering the question must answer 'Yes I have.' regardless of the truth. The student who asked the question can then ask as many further questions as he likes in order to help him decide whether the truth is being told or not. Obviously, sometimes they'll be telling the truth. The third student can also join in with questions, thereby 'ganging up' on student B. Listen how students fabricate stories in an attempt to avoid questions! When the first student feels he's heard enough he says 'No further questions' and writes 'True' or 'False' next to the question. The game then carries on (student B asks a question to student C and so on) When all the questions have been asked the papers are passed to the left for marking i.e. the truth is revealed. The highest score out of five wins. 
This game will really open your eyes to people's ability to LIE. 
Here are the questions. You can use different ones, obviously. 

Have you ever… 
spoken to a famous person? 
danced on a table in a public place?
been trapped in a lift?
taken an illegal drug? 
sung karaoke?

Have you ever… 
appeared on television?
left a bar or restaurant without paying? 
written graffiti on a wall? 
appeared in a photograph in a newspaper? 
chased a criminal? 

Have you ever… 
done a very dangerous sport? 
won a medal or trophy?
missed a flight? 
stayed in a five-star hotel?
swum naked in the sea? 

A typical exchange might be something like: 
- Have you ever swum naked in the sea? 
- Yes I have. 
- Where did you do it? 
- Erm. On holiday in Majorca. 
- Who were you with? 
- Some friends. 
- What were their names? 
- Erm...etc. 

Submitted by Bradley George

People Who ...

Level: Any Level

An activity whose aim is to complete sentences and also take advantage of the contributions in order to generate debate and interaction.

How: Just hand out the following sheet with the heading

PEOPLE WHO ...

and tell the students they have to complete the sentences with realism-not just adding on a grammatically correct ending.

PARK THEIR CARS ON THE FOOTPATH ...

WHO DON'T PAY TAX ...

WHO THROW LITTER ON THE GROUND ...

WHO GIVE MONEY TO CHARITIES ...

EAT CRISPS AT THE CINEMA ARE ...

WHO DRINK AND DRIVE ...

WHO TRAVEL A LOT ...

WHO SAVE LOTS OF MONEY ...

WATCH TV ALL DAY ...

GO TO THE OPERA ...

EAT FROG'S LEGS ...

CLIMB EVEREST ...

HUNT WHALES ...

EAT TOO MUCH ...

DRIVE TOO FAST ...

JUMP QUEUES ...

WHISTLE AT GIRLS ...

SMOKE IN PUBLIC SPACES ...

EARN A LOT OF MONEY ...

THROW THEIR OLD COOKER INTO A FIELD ...

SNORE ...

Etc .......... (Add more!)

NB: The idea is to get personal, individual endings. For example, for

"People who eat crisps in the cinema ...",

I got: 
annoy me 
should eat them before the show 
make a lot of noise 
have a right to do so (!)

As you can see, everybody has a different answer-and opinion. The latter is what generates talk.

So you kill two birds with one stone: You practise grammar and you get students talking.


Submitted by Gerard Counihan ermo Flores Grajales

Name the Place

Level: Any Level

 

 

First prepare a list of places about 20 on seperate pieces of paper and then divide the students into groups of 4-6. One member of the group chooses a piece of paper and between the group they prepare a dialogue or mini-theatre based on their place. When all the groups have prepared their work they take it in turns to read or play them out and the other students have to guess the name of the place it is taking place. A time limit can be based on the level of the students. I find this works very well with student who do not have enough confidence to just speak without preperation, but after the exercise they gain a lot of confidence by trying to speak by not looking. 

Submitted by Gina Tuncer( practical teacher in Turkey)

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